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Many times I see students get paralyzed by the idea of writing dissertation (or paper). Anne Lamott gives this advice to struggling writers: Thirty years ago, my older brother, who was ten years old at the time, was trying to get a report on birds written that he’d had three months to write. [It] was due the next day. We were out at our family cabin in Bolinas, and he was at the kitchen table close to tears, surrounded by binder paper and pencils and unopened books on birds immobilized by the hugeness of the task ahead.

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In March, the ASA published a special issue of The American Statistician (TAS) related to statistical inference in the 21st century. In the initial article, Moving to a World Beyond “p < 0.05”, Wassersein, Schirm, and Lazar (2019) write for the ASA saying, “The ASA Statement on P-Values and Statistical Significance stopped just short of recommending that declarations of “statistical significance” be abandoned. We take that step here. We conclude, based on our review of the articles in this special issue and the broader literature, that it is time to stop using the term “statistically significant” entirely.

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I just finished helping out with two StatPREP workshops in Columbia, Maryland and Fort Worth, Texas, respectively. StatPREP is an initiative of the Mathematical Association of America (MAA), in conjunction with American Mathematical Association of Two-Year Colleges (AMATYC) and the American Statistical Association (ASA), to introduce data and computing into introductory statistics courses—specifically in community college classrooms. Summer 2019 StatPREP participants and workshop leaders at Howard Community College Each summer, workshops are held in four locations, and each location hosts a workshop for two consecutive years.

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I was recently perusing a book from 1960, Minnesota Heritage: A Panoramic Narrative of the Historical Development of the North Star State and came across the following map showing the locations of the colleges and universities in the state at the time. Figure 1: Minnesota Colleges and Universities in 1960 The text referring to the map made an inference about the accessibility to higher education, At a glance the map shows, these facilities for higher education are quite uneveny distributed.

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The way mathematics is currently taught it is exceedingly dull. In the calculus book we are currently using on my campus, I found no single problem whose answer I felt the student would care about! The problems in the text have the dignity of solving a crossword puzzle — hard to be sure, but the result is of no significance in life. Richard Hamming, Calculus and Discrete Mathematics

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In the fall of 2008 (maybe 2007; my memory is fleeting) our department moved from Burton Hall to the, at the time, newly renovated Education Sciences Building. This building is beautiful from the outside; brick, overlooking the Mississippi River. The building was designed in such a way that (at least on my floor) there are two long parallel hallways with the faculty offices on the outside of these hallways (running the exterior wall of the building) and the interior filled with lab space (small offices) for research grants.

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Last week I attended the United States Conference on Teaching Statistics. The biennial conference, which took place at Penn State, attracts statistics educators and statistics education researchers from across the world. It was a fantastic conference with keynotes from Jane Watson, Allen Schirm and Ron Wasserstein, John Kruschke, and Kari Lock Morgan. I cajoled four of my graduate students (Jonathan Brown, Mike Huberty, Chelsey Legacy, and Vimal Rao) to tag along, and it was fun to see them interacting with the people and ideas presented.

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Ethan Brown, one of our Statistics Education students successfully defended his dissertation today! His dissertation research looked at how a sequence of structured activities impact students’ understanding about the Empirical Law of Large Numbers and sampling uncertainty. Ethan presented some of his preliminary analyses of this work at ICOTS 10 in Kyoto, Japan last year and received a commendation for that work [read his paper here. Ethan at the public part of his Final Oral Examination.

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Karen Kelsky writes about the importance of identifying a research plan and building your CV around this plan in her book The Professor is In: The Essential Guide to Turning Your Ph.D. into a Job. A reader once wrote to explain: During my years as a tenure track assistant professor, I went about publishing and doing research the way I do the grocery shopping: concentrating on the sale items like conferences, book reviews, on-line collaborations, i.

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On April 26, 2019, two of my Statistics Education graduate students, Chelsey Legacy and Vimal Rao, were given awards during the annual Psychological Foundations and QME Awards and Recognition Ceremony. Chelsey Legacy (first row; right) was awarded the Graduate Student Teaching Award for her incredible work in the EPsy 3264 classroom. Vimal Rao (second row; second from right) was awarded the Graduate Student Leadership Award for his work in building community.

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