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On April 26, 2019, two of my Statistics Education graduate students, Chelsey Legacy and Vimal Rao, were given awards during the annual Psychological Foundations and QME Awards and Recognition Ceremony. Chelsey Legacy (first row; right) was awarded the Graduate Student Teaching Award for her incredible work in the EPsy 3264 classroom. Vimal Rao (second row; second from right) was awarded the Graduate Student Leadership Award for his work in building community.

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My colleague Joseph Rios and I helped organize a monthly reading and seminar series, QME and Friends Read, for interested graduate students in our program. In March, we hosted a seminar on the Curriculum Vitae, or CV. In preparing for that seminar, I looked through many faculty and student CVs. I also read many blog posts, and scholarly work about putting together a CV. Based on all of this and my own expereiences and advice given to me, I decided to put together a post (maybe multiple posts) that includes some suggestions for compiling a CV.

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My dad was a mathematics teacher at Sartell High School and was also really into computing and programming. I remember learning BASIC with him on our Apple IIe and also programming our TI-99/4A. (To save a program on the TI, we had to hook up an external tape recorder and write to a cassette tape. Then to run the program, you played the tape!) Old issues of Byte, Compute, Family Computing (check out the 1982 TV ad below), and other magazines and educational trades were stacked a mile-high in our living room; many providing the outlines of a program to create some graphical spectacle (e.

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On Friday April 26, 2019 I gave an invited talk to the Department of Speech-Language-Hearing Sciences in their Pro-Sem series. These are really neat as they are organized by the graduate students. This is the third one of these I have given over the years and each is a treat. In this talk I spoke about the ASA’s recent call for the deprecation of “statistical significance” and all its related variants (e.

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On Saturday August 25, 2018 at 8:08 PM I finally hit Inbox Zero! Inbox Zero I did it by immediately copying the snippets of email I wanted into Evernote notes (my notetaking system). I also attended to to-dos more immediately, or added them to a note of “To-Dos”. I doubt I will stay at zero emails in my inbox, but I have been at fewer than 10 emails all summer.

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I am giving a talk at the 46th Annual Meeting of the Statistical Society of Canada in Montreal on June 05, 2018. The talk is part of an invited session on Teaching Statistics to Graduate Students in the Health and Social Sciences. Information, including the slides, is available below. Title: Statistical Computing: Non-Ignorable Missingness in the Graduate-Level Social Science Curriculum Abstract: In 2010, Nolan and Temple Lang pointed out that "

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R Markdown is a great way to integrate R code into a document. An example of the default theme used in R Markdown HTML documents is shown below. Pre-Packaged Themes There are several other canned themes you can use rather than the default theme. There are 12 additional themes that you can use without installing any other packages: “cerulean”, “cosmo”, “flatly”, “journal”, “lumen”, “paper”, “readable”, “sandstone”, “simplex”, “spacelab”, “united”, and “yeti”.

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It feels like this spring has been especially terrible weather-wise. We have gotten a lot of snow and it has been cold. To evaluate whether this is the case or whether I have hindsight bias, I pulled some historical weather data for the month of April from Weather Underground. library(dplyr) library(forcats) library(ggplot2) library(ggridges) library(readr) library(viridis) # Read in data april = read_csv("~/Documents/github/Public-Stuff/data/april-weather.csv") # Filter dates april = april %>% filter(date <= 11) I grabbed data back to 2008 (avialable at https://raw.

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This post is the fourth (and last) in a series of blogposts in which I respond to questions from the students in the Becoming a Teacher of Statistics course. In today’s posting I respond to questions that asked me for predictions about the future of statistics teaching and statistics education research. Before I get into the Q&A, let me just state: Prediction is hard. Leland Wilkinson in The Future of Statistical Computing reminded us of this when he cited a prediction about computers that Andrew Hamilton made in a 1949 issue of Popular Mechanics

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My colleague Robert delMas is teaching our doctoral-level research seminar, EPsy 8271 next fall, and it looks to be an interesting topic. The details about the course follow: EPSY 8271 | Statistics Education Research Seminar: Teaching Statistics from a Modeling Perspective (3 credits) Day/Time: Fridays, 9:00 a.m.–11:30 a.m. (Fall 2018) Location: 220 Wulling Hall Instructor: Robert delMas, Ph.D. This seminar will focus on research related to teaching introductory statistics through a modeling approach.

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