Andrew Zieffler

Academic. Data lover. Statistics enthusiast.

What to do about p-values?

In March, the ASA published a special issue of The American Statistician (TAS) related to statistical inference in the 21st century. In the initial article, Moving to a World Beyond “p < 0.05”, Wassersein, Schirm, and Lazar (2019) write for the ASA saying, “The ASA Statement on P-Values and Statistical Significance stopped just short of recommending that declarations of “statistical significance” be abandoned. We take that step here. We conclude, based on our review of the articles in this special issue and the broader literature, that it is time to stop using the term “statistically significant” entirely.

2019 StatPREP Workshops

I just finished helping out with two StatPREP workshops in Columbia, Maryland and Fort Worth, Texas, respectively. StatPREP is an initiative of the Mathematical Association of America (MAA), in conjunction with American Mathematical Association of Two-Year Colleges (AMATYC) and the American Statistical Association (ASA), to introduce data and computing into introductory statistics courses—specifically in community college classrooms. Summer 2019 StatPREP participants and workshop leaders at Howard Community College Each summer, workshops are held in four locations, and each location hosts a workshop for two consecutive years.

Higher Education in Minnesota

I was recently perusing a book from 1960, Minnesota Heritage: A Panoramic Narrative of the Historical Development of the North Star State and came across the following map showing the locations of the colleges and universities in the state at the time. Figure 1: Minnesota Colleges and Universities in 1960 The text referring to the map made an inference about the accessibility to higher education, At a glance the map shows, these facilities for higher education are quite uneveny distributed.

Richard Hamming on the Teaching of Mathematics

The way mathematics is currently taught it is exceedingly dull. In the calculus book we are currently using on my campus, I found no single problem whose answer I felt the student would care about! The problems in the text have the dignity of solving a crossword puzzle — hard to be sure, but the result is of no significance in life. Richard Hamming, Calculus and Discrete Mathematics

Change: Time and Effort

In the fall of 2008 (maybe 2007; my memory is fleeting) our department moved from Burton Hall to the, at the time, newly renovated Education Sciences Building. This building is beautiful from the outside; brick, overlooking the Mississippi River. The building was designed in such a way that (at least on my floor) there are two long parallel hallways with the faculty offices on the outside of these hallways (running the exterior wall of the building) and the interior filled with lab space (small offices) for research grants.