Andrew Zieffler

Academic. Data lover. Statistics enthusiast.

What to do about p-values?

In March, the ASA published a special issue of The American Statistician (TAS) related to statistical inference in the 21st century. In the initial article, Moving to a World Beyond “p < 0.05”, Wassersein, Schirm, and Lazar (2019) write for the ASA saying, “The ASA Statement on P-Values and Statistical Significance stopped just short of recommending that declarations of “statistical significance” be abandoned. We take that step here. We conclude, based on our review of the articles in this special issue and the broader literature, that it is time to stop using the term “statistically significant” entirely.

2019 StatPREP Workshops

I just finished helping out with two StatPREP workshops in Columbia, Maryland and Fort Worth, Texas, respectively. StatPREP is an initiative of the Mathematical Association of America (MAA), in conjunction with American Mathematical Association of Two-Year Colleges (AMATYC) and the American Statistical Association (ASA), to introduce data and computing into introductory statistics courses—specifically in community college classrooms. Summer 2019 StatPREP participants and workshop leaders at Howard Community College Each summer, workshops are held in four locations, and each location hosts a workshop for two consecutive years.

USCOTS 2019

Last week I attended the United States Conference on Teaching Statistics. The biennial conference, which took place at Penn State, attracts statistics educators and statistics education researchers from across the world. It was a fantastic conference with keynotes from Jane Watson, Allen Schirm and Ron Wasserstein, John Kruschke, and Kari Lock Morgan. I cajoled four of my graduate students (Jonathan Brown, Mike Huberty, Chelsey Legacy, and Vimal Rao) to tag along, and it was fun to see them interacting with the people and ideas presented.

Congratulations Ethan!

Ethan Brown, one of our Statistics Education students successfully defended his dissertation today! His dissertation research looked at how a sequence of structured activities impact students’ understanding about the Empirical Law of Large Numbers and sampling uncertainty. Ethan presented some of his preliminary analyses of this work at ICOTS 10 in Kyoto, Japan last year and received a commendation for that work [read his paper here. Ethan at the public part of his Final Oral Examination.

Student Awards! So Proud!

On April 26, 2019, two of my Statistics Education graduate students, Chelsey Legacy and Vimal Rao, were given awards during the annual Psychological Foundations and QME Awards and Recognition Ceremony. Chelsey Legacy (first row; right) was awarded the Graduate Student Teaching Award for her incredible work in the EPsy 3264 classroom. Vimal Rao (second row; second from right) was awarded the Graduate Student Leadership Award for his work in building community.